Mirroring the Past

oldie
PhotoCredit: Google

In the days of our forefathers, the one with the largest household was most likely to be the richest in the village, if the not the richest in his ethnic group. The reason was simple: the more hands you had on your farm, the more food crops you will yield. Output therefore, was directly proportional to the input multiplied by a constant k. Moreover, the ‘input’ must be significant, and the larger the constant, the larger your output.

But then as times evolved, it was not enough to invest your strength in the farms only. Now those whose strength could conquer towns and other kingdoms became the heroes of their time. They ensured that all who had big farms and cattle herds gave them a portion every year as a way of paying ‘homage’.

In these days, it is not about having a larger number of children to cultivate your farms, neither will you be able to conquer neighbouring kingdoms by building your muscles. We are in the age of using and building our intellect.

It has become increasingly important that, if not a prerequisite, that the more you become knowledgeable, the more successful you will be. In the same respect, by knowing more skills and becoming versatile, you become a pillar in every organisation you find yourself. This can also help you even in running your own business.

Past-and-Future-PUIRM
PhotoCredit: Google

In effect, nothing much has changed from the past. It is just that, instead of having more children to increase your output in farms as our forefather did, rather, you must have more knowledge and skills to increase your worth and value.

My name is Kotey, and invest rightly in yourself.

Good morning.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s